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This video briefly explains what to consider when choosing a diamond. It covers an overview of the 4Cs grading system.

The diamond color evaluation is based on the absence of color. A chemically pure and structurally perfect diamond has no hue, like a drop of pure water, and consequently, a higher value.

GIA's D-to-Z color-grading scale is the industry's most widely accepted grading system. The scale begins with the letter D, representing colorless, and continues, with increasing presence of color, to the letter Z.

Use this interactive tool to visualize the differences between each color grade.



Here is a one-minute video quickly explains the Diamond Color.

Natural diamonds are the result of carbon exposed to tremendous heat and pressure deep in the earth. This process can result in a variety of internal characteristics called 'inclusions' and external characteristics called 'blemishes.'

Evaluating diamond clarity involves determining the number, size, relief, nature, and position of these characteristics, as well as how these affect the overall appearance of the stone. While no diamond is perfectly pure, the closer it comes, the higher its value. To the naked eye, a VS1 and an SI2 diamond may look the same, but these diamonds are quite different in terms of overall quality.

Use this interactive tool to visualize the differences between each clarity grade.



Here is a one-minute video quickly explains the Diamond Clarity.

A diamond's cut grade is about how well a diamond's facets interact with light. Precise artistry and workmanship are required to fashion a stone so its proportions, symmetry, and polish deliver the magnificent return of light only possible in a diamond.

The quality of the cut is crucial to the diamond's final beauty and value. And of all the 4Cs, it is the most complex and technically difficult to analyze.

The GIA Cut Grading System for the standard round brilliant diamond evaluates seven components. The first three, brightness, fire, and scintillation, consider the diamond's overall face-up appearance. The remaining four, weight ratio, durability, polish, and symmetry, assess a diamond's design and craftsmanship.
  • Brightness: Internal and external white light reflected from a diamond.
  • Fire: The scattering of white light into all the colors of the rainbow.
  • Scintillation: The sparkle a diamond produces, and the pattern of light and dark areas caused by reflections within the diamond.


Use this interactive tool to visualize the differences between each cut grade.



Here is a one-minute video quickly explains the Diamond Cut.

Diamond carat weight is the measurement of how much a diamond weighs. A metric "carat" is defined as 200 milligrams. Each carat can be subdivided into 100 'points.' This allows very precise measurements to the hundredth decimal place.

All else being equal, diamond price increases with carat weight, because larger diamonds are more rare and more desirable. But two diamonds of equal carat weight can have very different values (and prices) depending on three other factors within the 4Cs: Clarity, Color, and Cut.

Use this interactive tool to visualize the differences between each carat weight.



Here is a one-minute video quickly explains the Diamond Carat Weight.


This video briefly answers one of the most frequently asked questions by our customers: how to read a GIA grading report?